Deepening Discipleship

Mary, thinking that he is the gardener, says to him, “My lord, if you have carried him off, tell me where you put him, and I will take him away.”  Jesus says to her, “Mary.”  Turning, she says to him in Hebrew, “Rabbouni” (which means “Teacher”).  Jesus says to her, “Do not cling to me,[read more]

Fear and New Life

“God raised this Jesus; of this we are all witnesses.  Exalted at the right hand of God, he poured forth the promise of the Holy Spirit that he received from the Father, as you both see and hear.” Acts 2:32-33 And behold, Jesus met them on their way and greeted them.  They approached, embraced his[read more]

Where Is God Now?

The Judaeans answered Pilate, “We have a Law, and according to the Law he ought to die because he has made himself out to be God’s Son.”  When, therefore, Pilate heard this statement he was more afraid, and again went into the Praetorium and says to Jesus, “Where are you from?”  But Jesus did not[read more]

Do As I Have Done

So when he had washed their feet and put his garments back on and reclined at table again, he said to them, “Do you realize what I have done for you?  You call me ‘teacher’ and ‘master,’ and rightly so, for indeed I am.  If I, therefore, the master and teacher, have washed your feet,[read more]

Friendship and Betrayal

The Lord God is my help, / therefore I am not disgraced; / I have set my face like flint, / knowing that I shall not be put to shame. / He is near who upholds my right; / if anyone wishes to oppose me, / let us appear together. / Who disputes my right?[read more]

For the Day of My Burial

Psychoanalysis teaches that we construct our personalities, what we might call our “character armor,” as a defense against our experience of loss. There is, perhaps, no greater human suffering than that of loss, than of facing the truth of the fact that everyone and everything that we love, including ourselves, will die. So, much of what we take to be our lives, to be our very selves, is constituted by our means of evading and forgetting the reality of loss and death.[read more]

In Our Living and Our Dying

“If I give myself glory, my glory is nothing.  It is my Father—of whom you say, ‘He is our God’—who gives me glory; and you have not known him, but I know him.  And if I say I do not know him, I shall be a liar like you; rather, I know him and keep[read more]

As Members of the Church

Yesterday I experienced one of those exceptional and, in a good way, disturbing moments in life. A very good friend said to me: “As a religious community in the Church, you guys don’t have the right to just say who you are on your own. You have a responsibility to us, and you need to dialogue with us who we need you to be.”[read more]

Sadness and Joy

As, in a liturgical and scriptural sense, we move inexorably toward the mystery of the passion, death, and resurrection of Jesus, we are drawn into the profound paradox of human experience that it is only in ceasing to flee from suffering and sadness that we come to recognize and realize the joy that is beyond telling. We know from psychoanalysis that it is the nature of our unconscious to crave and seek pleasure and to avoid pain. Yet, as pleasure and joy are not at all the same thing, to live unconsciously, as the Pharisees do, is to never know[read more]